Kent V. Hasen, MD: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery & Med Spa of Naples
3699 Airport Pulling Road North
Naples, FL 34105
Phone: (239) 262-5662
Monday-Friday: 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

The Invisible Benefits of Tummy Tuck Surgery

The Invisible Benefits of Tummy Tuck Surgery

If you’re considering a tummy tuck in the Naples-Fort Myers area, your primary goal is probably to reduce excess skin and smooth your abdomen. But there are additional, overlooked benefits to this popular body contouring procedure—and you may be surprised to learn some of them. A tummy tuck is great for contouring your physique, but read on to discover its lesser-known perks.

  • Decreased back pain. “Back pain” is a fairly nonspecific complaint that can have a multitude of causes, but weakened abdominal muscles can definitely play a role. Without a strong core, the body puts most of its weight on the back muscles, which can lead to poor posture and back pain. One critical element of a tummy tuck is surgical tightening of the abdominal muscles. This plus reduced weight around your midsection can decrease the strain on your back and encourage better posture and generally improved comfort.
  • Lasting weight loss. If you’ve undergone bariatric surgery, you know that losing the weight is only half the battle. Keeping it off can be just as difficult, and for most people it’s a lifelong effort. During bariatric weight loss surgery, the size of the stomach is reduced, thereby limiting the amount of food you can comfortably or safely consume. This often results in rapid weight loss. However, quick weight loss has its caveats—namely loose, leftover skin. When weight loss happens fast, the skin doesn’t always have the opportunity to “bounce back” over the body’s new contours. Loose, empty skin can’t be remedied by working out or using any sort of topical products. Surgical excision, such as a tummy tuck, is the only way to achieve a tight result. But there’s an added perk for bariatric patients who undergo body contouring after their weight loss. Studies have shown that they’re more likely than their counterparts who didn’t have body contouring surgery to keep the weight off.
  • Fewer incidences of “leakage.” After childbirth, women may experience occasional urine leakage, known as “stress urinary incontinence,” which occurs when laughing, sneezing, or making other similar movements. If you experience this symptom and are scheduled for a full tummy tuck, I can use a small amount of soft tissue to partially obstruct the bladder, reducing incidences of bladder leakage. This type of procedure is quite safe, extremely effective, and not achievable with a mini tummy tuck. Watch the video here to learn more about the differences between the 2 procedures:
  • Hernia relief. Hernias come in many different iterations, but the most common version is a ventral hernia. This common condition develops when abdominal or gastrointestinal tissue breaks through the abdominal wall. Although many people with hernias may not feel symptoms, some experience pain or a visible bulge. Occasionally, the tissue can become trapped in the hole, which has the potential to become quite serious. Hernias require surgical repair—and a highly experienced plastic surgeon can perform hernia repair at same time as a tummy tuck.
  • Easier exercise. It sounds almost too good to be true. But anyone with excess skin or fat around the abdomen knows that this extra bulk can make working out uncomfortable and difficult. With more improved abdominal tone and shape, activities such as running, swimming, and cycling can become downright fun (we promise).

While the most popular outcome of a tummy tuck is to dramatically change your appearance, its lesser-known benefits can be the difference between merely looking good and feeling better than you have in years.

See your potential for beautiful results in my before-and-after gallery.

When you’re ready to schedule your consultation, or if you’d simply like more information, visit our contact page or call us at (239) 201-4938.

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